· be so homogenous, however, they aligned with the

·        
The higher the concentration of magnesium in the
solution used to water the plants, the better the growth of the plants was.

·        
The plants given the higher magnesium
concentrations were visibly greener, appeared more robust and the stems felt
much steadier. The stems with no to very low magnesium were droopy.

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

·        
Fertilized plants did better than non-fertilized
plants.

·        
Plants with longer roots had better growth,
in general, fertilized plants had longer roots.

·        
The roots of the plants that received higher
concentrations of magnesium were thicker and longer.

Part 2

·        
The higher the concentration of the solution
used to water the plants, the better the growth of the plants was.

·        
Fertilized plants did better than
non-fertilized plants, however, not to such as an extent as part 1. It seemed
that the longer the experiment was conducted for, the difference between fertilized
and non-fertilized would eventually level off, possibly because nutrients had
been re-filled in the top soil or the roots had been able to tap into nutrients
at the bottom of the soil.   

·        
The rate of germination remained constant
throughout for both parts.

3.3 Processed Data

 

The combined data
collected for seeds that germinated in fertilized vs unfertilized soil for both
trials was very similar. This leads to the conclusion that the concentrations
of magnesium have little to do with germination. For each pot, at least 75% of
seeds germinated.  

 

 

(PTO)

CHAPTER IV:
DISCUSSION AND EVALUATION

4.1 Evaluation of Results

Average length of fertilized vs
non-fertilized plants at 2 weeks vs 4 weeks

As the concentrations of magnesium
increased, the average length of fertilized versus non-fertilized plants at 2
weeks and 4 weeks increased roughly proportionally. The results were not
expected to be so homogenous, however, they aligned with the hypothesis that
greater growth would ensue if the concentrations of magnesium increased and
that the fertilizer would reduce the negative impact the magnesium deficiency
would have on the growing plants.  The
reason as to why the results may have been so homogenous might be explainable
through the process of dormancy1.
Initially, when seeds are dormant, meaning their growth is barred until
suitable environmental characteristics are met, they have enough nutrients to
grow on a short-term basis. When the seeds were soaked for 24 hours, they had
begun to exit dormancy and begin germination. To stimulate the flooding, the
water was added at this point. After the water had been soaked and evaporated
to a sufficient level to plant the seeds, the seeds were planted. Because seeds
store enough resources for a short-term, they were able to fare better than
they would have otherwise, as the soil lacked some nutrients such as magnesium.
By the time the seeds became sprouts and were more reliant on the soil, the
magnesium solution had largely replenished the soil. This allowed the process
of germination to continue unabatedly.

Average weight of fertilized vs
non-fertilized plants at 2 weeks vs 4 weeks

As the concentrations of magnesium
increased, the average weight of fertilized versus non-fertilized plants at
both 2 and 4 weeks increased. This followed the expected hypothesis because as
the length of the plant increases, it is logical that the weight increases too.
However, as compared to the correlation of average length, the results were not
as clear of a trend, especially at the 4-week period. This was expected because
the greater length of the plant would enable multiple branches to grow. The
reasoning made sense, though it became flawed because only 2-4 branches grew
for each of the plants. A key reason for the difference in weight for the 2nd
phase of the investigation (4 weeks) may have been that the plants suffered a
serious fruit fly infestation that caused quite a bit of damage to the leaves
of some plants. As leaves are critical for photosynthesis to take place, this,
as well as the missing parts of leaves, may have been a deciding factor in why
the weight of fertilized vs non-fertilized plants at 4 weeks is hard to
discern. Alternatively, the plants may have overcome the effects that magnesium
deficiency had caused. However, this is unlikely because the lack of essential
nutrients during growth causes a permanent effect in both plants and humans.

 

1
Bewley, D. J. (n.d.). Seed
Germination and Dormancy. Retrieved November 07, 2017, from
http://www.biologyreference.com/Re-Se/Seed-Germination-and-Dormancy.html